Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Tuesday, June28th: Matthew Klane, Lisa Ciccarello, and Drew Grow

Time again for KIDNAP!

Hello! Come 'round 'round 7:33 this next Tuesday for an all-new all-nude review! Poet Matthew Klane is visiting our lovely city, and we have Lisa Ciccarello, Drew Grow, and you all to welcome him! Please wear clothes!

Will you bring some beer to share or some cash for the donation jar? Want to buy a book by someone in the room? Want to hawk yours? Please make sure to introduce yourselves to people until you're sure we've all met!


Matthew Klane is editor and co-founder of Flim Forum Press. His book is B_____ Meditations (Stockport Flats, 2008). Recent work can be found in Taiga, muthafucka, Harp & Altar, and Word For/Word. He currently lives and writes in Iowa City.


Lisa Ciccarello is the author of two chapbooks: At night (Scantily Clad Press, 2009) & At night, the dead (Blood Pudding Press, 2009). Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Glitterpony, elimae, Anti-, Poor Claudia, Saltgrass, H_NGM_N & Corduroy Mtn., among others. Her [stunning] photography can be found at like been hounding me how you can't imagine and her blog Punching Little Birds in the Face has recently been updated with a early summer mixtape.


Across the globe, there are hundreds of young men and women who have taken up acoustic guitars, inspired by the grand folk and country tradition, and set about put their sleeve-worn hearts into musical form. But the result is often feather light and wispy and all too easily forgotten amid the din of the modern age.

Not so with the music of Drew Grow and the Pastors Wives.

The music on the band's self-titled LP (released on their own Amigo/Amiga label) shares the influence of many current indie artists, but carries with much more meat and gristle to chew on. It feels like it was molded after a long life of ups and downs, all set a soundtrack of the curlicued songwriting of Bob Dylan, the drowsy despair of Bill Callahan/Smog, and a thick stack of dusty Motown and Stax 45s.

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